Stay Safe With The Best Form Of Safety – An Equestrian Helmet

If you intend learning to horse ride it would be foolish to begin without an equestrian helmet.  Even experienced riders can be thrown from a horse or simply fall off for any number of reasons.  A novice rider has even more chance of falling off.  In fact, the horsy crowd regards falling off as a rite of passage for a novice rider.  If you fall off you will have to get back on and continue.  You will be able to carry on as usual if you are not injured.  The risk of injury is greater if you do not wear a helmet while riding.

A riding helmet is worn to keep you from incurring a head injury.  It is of the utmost importance you buy a helmet that is guaranteed to be a safety helmet.  It is advisable to buy a helmet new from a reputable equestrian apparel stockist.  If you do buy a used riding helmet you must be sure it has never been damaged.  If it is damaged by eve a hairline crack it will not keep your skull safe.

An important consideration when you buy your helmet is the fit.  You must try on the helmet before you buy it.  Helmets do come in a variety of sizes.  When you place the helmet on your head it must be snug and not shift about.  Make sure the chin strap can be adjusted to keep the helmet firm.  If you have long hair ask for a helmet that comes with a ponytail port.

An equestrian helmet is not meant to be worn tilted in any way.  A helmet that is tilted front or backward leaves parts of your skull vulnerable to injury.  There is also the danger of the helmet completely slipping off.

Riding helmets are constantly being researched and updated.  This means they are constantly being improved.  The primary purpose of a helmet is to provide protection against injury but the latest helmets are very light and also allow the scalp to breathe.  This makes the wearing of a helmet a lot more comfortable because riders do work up a sweat during a ride.

If you are an enthusiastic and dedicated rider who spends a lot of time on a horse then you should upgrade your helmet on a regular basis.  If you do, your head will always be protected by the most up to date technology available in equestrian apparel.

If you are a novice rider you must understand the importance of wearing a riding helmet.  You must get into the habit of readjusting your helmet each time you wear it.  A helmet is not only meant to protect your head if you fall.  A helmet is also meant to protect your head from being kicked by a hoof.  This means you should always wear your helmet properly even when grooming a horse.

An equestrian helmet is not a fashion item.  Even though helmets come in a wide range of colours and shades this is safety wear that is compulsory to all those who come into close contact with a horse.

About the Author: Fox Lodge Saddlery are one of the UK’s leading specialists in Equestrian Supplies and clothing from this Equestrian Helmet to jumpers and fleeces. To view the full range of equipment on offer from Fox Lodge Saddlery, visit us today at http://www.foxlodgesaddlery.co.uk/

Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

Similar Horse Boarding & Care News:

  1. do you need to braid your horse for jumper shows? i was just wondering if you need to braid your…
  2. What Horse Supplies Do I Need To Enjoy Riding? If wishes were horses, then beggars would ride. Or so…

Can you show at your county fair if your horse is unregistered?

I will be showing for my first time next year at the county fair (I live in Minnesota and I am 15) and I am wanting to know if I can show my horse if she is unregistered? Thanks!
if your county is like ours then yes. They HAVE classes for registered horses but they have open classes, unregistered pure classes as well. And if you do barrel racing etc at the show then it doesn’t matter on breed just your age. But you need health papers, coggins etc turned in advanced. When it gets closer to  the show see if your extension office has a fair book or some sort with everything you need to know! Good Luck

 

4 Responses

  1. katydid Says:     May 20th, 2010 at 7:28 pm If this is an open show, you should be able to participate.  Call the county extension office to ask for rules/regulations….if they’re not able to tell you, they should be able to advise you as to whom to call. References : Horse owner
  2. Stephaniieee =] Says:     May 20th, 2010 at 8:14 pm if it is an open show (not a breed/specific show) then yes, it is totally okay for your horse to be unregistered. the only thing your horse will need is her coggins test. References :
  3. 3dayeventerintraining Says:     May 20th, 2010 at 8:41 pm if ur county is like ours then yes. They HAVE classes for registered horses but they have open classes, unregistered pure classes as well. And if you do barrel racing etc at the show then it doesn’t matter on breed just your age. But you need health papers, coggins etc turned in advanced. When it gets closer to  the show see if your extention office has a fair book or some sort with everything you need to know! Good Luck References : in 4-H showing pigs cows and horses for 5 yrs! Live in the great state of Kansas :D
  4. LBentforLeather!! Says:     May 20th, 2010 at 9:13 pm County fairs have  both open and registered classes.  Your horse is welcome in the open classes.  Good Luck. References :

Leave a Comment

Please note: Comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

Do you need to braid your horse for jumper shows?

 I was just wondering if you need to braid your horse for show jumping? Not hunters but jumpers.

You don’t have to, but most people do… I only braid the top part of the tail, and let the rest flow natural and I pull the mane so it is neater in appearance… but that’s just my preference. You can braid all or nothing… which ever you prefer…. there’s not a braid rule.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Similar Horse Boarding & Care News:

  1. Shows Leah and Gigi (student and horse trained under Shannyn Welsh)…
  2. How to help your horse feel safe with you Kerri Lake facilitates Interspecies Communication, blending traditional training and disciplines…
  3. How to fit your saddle Dr. Joanna Robson shows you how to tell if your…
  4. Showing plaiting If you want your horse looking his best, then there’s…

Posted in Showing your horse |  5 Comments »

 

5 Responses

  1. ANIMAL EXPERT Says:     May 20th, 2010 at 7:07 pm You don’t have to, but most people do… I only braid the top part of the tail, and let the rest flow natural and I pull the mane so it is neater in appearance… but thats just my preference. You can braid all or nothing… which ever you prefer…. there’s not a braid rule. References :
  2. theshadow01 Says:     May 20th, 2010 at 7:34 pm Most show jumpers do not braid.  Only at the international level will you find riders that braid their jumpers.  At the big shows it costs upwards of $100 to have your horse braided, and it is not a requirement. References : “A” show hunter/jumper groom for 14 years.
  3. allaroundrider Says:     May 20th, 2010 at 7:53 pm yes most of the time it would depend on the show and the judge though  it would probably be better to just braid the horse that way you know that won’t look down on you for braiding and even if it wasn’t necessary your horse looks neat and tidy References :
  4. Megan Says:     October 4th, 2010 at 4:44 pm It is against the rules for a judge to penalize you for being unbraided, even at a USEF rated show. That said, if you choose not to braid, make sure your horse’s mane is clean, short (3-5 in) and tidy and lays on only one side of his neck. If your choose to have your horse braided by a professional, make sure you arrange for it a day or two in advance, and that your braider knows what classes you will be showing in. I believe the going rate is $40 to $50 for the mane and $30 plus for the tail. Most people only braid the tail for classics or large horse shows.
  5. Julia Says:     November 11th, 2012 at 9:01 pm I don’t braid my horse’s mane, so  can have something to grab when jumping. I also braid the top part of the horse’s tail.

Leave a Comment

Please note: Comment moderation is enabled and may delay your comment. There is no need to resubmit your comment.

Is neatsfood oil bad for the stitching on your horse bridle?

I have always used neatsfoot oil in the past, but at this past horse show a lady told me that neatsfoot oil can damage the stitching on your bridle. Is this true or not true? I bought leather therapy brand conditioner. She told me it would darken my bridle. I have an edgewood. It did darken the bridle, but not as much as I would like. Even with multiple applications I just can’t get it to the way it looks when I use neatsfoot oil. The coloring also looks uneven. I have never had a bridle fall apart from using neatsfoot oil but maybe they mean long term? Have you tried any products like neatsfoot oil that make the leather soft, won’t damage stitching and also darkens?

When it is used in large amounts for long periods of time, yes, neatsfoot oil DOES rot stitching on a bridle- or on any other leather product, in fact. I normally only use neatsfoot very sparingly on my tack, and I make sure to wipe any excess off after I’m done. Neatsfoot oil is a conditioning agent for leather, but it is NOT a cleaner. To both clean and darken leather, you will need to use consistent applications of something like Lexol leather cleaner, followed by the conditioner made by the same company. Lexol DOES darken leather- that is how I get my new bridles and saddles darkened and broken in for use. You can also use Hydrophane, and follow that with Lexol if you want- that method will also work. Hope this helps.


Technorati Tags: , , , , , ,

Similar Horse Boarding & Care News:

  1. Shows Leah and Gigi (student and horse trained under Shannyn Welsh)…
  2. How to help your horse feel safe with you Kerri Lake facilitates Interspecies Communication, blending traditional training and disciplines…
  3. How to fit your saddle Dr. Joanna Robson shows you how to tell if your…
  4. do you need to braid your horse for jumper shows? i was just wondering if you need to braid your…

 

2 Responses

  1. Debi Says:     May 20th, 2010 at 7:33 pm I used to swear by neatsfoot oil but I read somewhere that it rots the stitching so I stopped using it. I now use hydrophane leather dressing or effax leather balm. Don’t know if either of them has the same darkening effect as neatsfoot though as all my tack is black now. References :
  2. Starlight 1 Says:     May 20th, 2010 at 7:59 pm When it is used in large amounts for long periods of time, yes, neatsfoot oil DOES rot stitching on a bridle- or on any other leather product, in fact. I normally only use neatsfoot very sparingly on my tack, and I make sure to wipe any excess off after I’m done. Neatsfoot oil is a conditioning agent for leather, but it is NOT a cleaner. To both clean and darken leather, you will need to use consistent applications of something like Lexol leather cleaner, followed by the conditioner made by the same company. Lexol DOES darken leather- that is how I get my new bridles and saddles darkened and broken in for use. You can also use Hydrophane, and follow that with Lexol if you want- that method will also work. Hope this helps. References : Horse owner and horse professional who has 20+ years experience, and who worked for a brief period with a Master Saddler.